During 2018, Royal Thai Government and Private Sector have joined hands to address the problem of child labour, force labour and slavery in fishing industry. A number of legislations were enacted and reviewed to respond to the present situation and address the exploitation more effectively. Several measures to prevent and suppress force labour and human trafficking were introduced. As a results of these efforts especially on new law and law enforcement, in 2018, the United States upgraded Thailand from Tier 2 Watch List to Tier 2 in its Trafficking in Person Report. In addition, Thailand has ratified the Protocol of 2014 to the Forced Labour Convention, 1930, and the National Legislative Assembly approved for Thailand to ratift the ILO Work in Fishing Convention, 2007 (No. 188). This proves Thailand’s political will to improve the situation of force labour in fishing industry.

Part 1 Imported Raw Materials

Part 2 Control throughout the Supply

Part 3 The Application of ILO-GLP in Thai tuna industry

Part 4 Promotion of UN principle on business and Human Rights based on the announced National Agenda “Human Rights as a Driving Force of Thailand 4.0 towards Sustainable Development”

Part 5 Collaboration with government, IGOs, and NGOs working on labour issues


Part I   Imported Raw Materials

Thai tuna industry imported frozen whole round tuna around 700,000 tons per year. In 2018, most of imported frozen whole round tuna are from Taiwan, South Korea, and the United States as detailed in the following table.

Table 1: Thai Imports of Frozen Whole Round Tuna from the World in 2016-2018

Source: www.moc.go.th,  Prepared by Thai Tuna Industry Association


Part 2 Control throughout the Supply

In order to prevent the use of forced and slave labour in TTIA members’ factories and their supply, the Association has the following policies and measures to control and TTIA members have pledged to conduct accordingly:

2.1 TTIA’s Ethical Labour Practice – Code of Conduct

One of the key activities that TTIA has done on labour issues is the policy commitment on Ethical Code of Conduct. Companies applying to our members are required to submit their written commitment in compliance with TTIA’s Ethical Labour Practice – Code of Conduct, mostly based on Thai law. It covers 8 items as follows:

1) No Child Labour: No workers under age of 18 years old is engaged or employed in the processing plants. Upon recruiting, all applicants shall provide a government-issued passport, Identity card and/or work permit for verifying age and legality to work respectively.

2)No Forced and Compulsory Labour: Workers are not required to pay deposits or recruitment fee to the company. The company shall not lodge passport, Identity card and/or work permit belonging to the workers. The company shall not withhold any part of workers’ salary and benefits.

3)No Discrimination: The company shall not allow any behavior indicating harassment, discrimination or bullying.  Education and training on the fundamental of human rights shall be conducted for all personnel concerning the supervision of workers and security practice.  The company shall have in place the mechanism and grievance handling to ensure fair treatment of workers

4) Health and Safety:  Occupational health and safety of workers shall be of the utmost concern for the company.  At minimum, all legal requirements of related laws must be fulfilled.  They include to the provision of necessary personal protective equipment at the employer’s expenses, first aid treatment, and assistance for follow-up medical treatment.

5)Freedom of Association and Right to Collective Bargaining:  As permitted by Thai law, the company shall respect the rights of workers for freedom of association and collective bargaining.

6) Disciplinary Practices: The company shall not engage in or tolerate the use of corporal punishment, mental or physical coercion, or verbal abuse of workers. Deductions from wages as a disciplinary measure are not allowed.

7) Remuneration: The minimum daily wage shall be fully paid according to Thai law to every workers.  Overtime work shall be reimbursed at a premium rate and paid leave shall be granted as defined by Thai Law.

8) Welfare and Benefit:   Social security payments are contributed by both workers and company – in accordance with Thai Labour Law – which ensure all workers are eligible for national health care coverage.  The company shall register every workers to this scheme from the first day of employment.  For the period where the national health care coverage is not yet in effect, the company shall provide adequate medical treatment and expenses to assist any work-related injuries and illnesses.

2.2 Ethical Code of Conduct in Supply Chain

The Association policy stipulated that members apply the ethical code of conduct both upstream and downstream of the supply chain in order to align to the association’s code.

2.3 TTIA’s Additional Regulation to Members

In 2016, TTIA established more conditions to members in order to regulate them to comply with international labor standards and social responsibility. For examples, getting Dolphin Safe approval by Earth Island Institute (EII) and cooperating in the implementation of Good Labour Practice (GLP). The regulations for membership application are as follows:

1) Both ordinary member (tuna processing factory) and extraordinary member (supporting industry business and traders) shall submit the Letter of Intent to become TTIA Membership, by stating that the company is pleased to fully support the compliance with TTIA policies in 3 aspects; namely, (1) Food Safety; (2) non IUU Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing Policy and Sustainability Policy; and (3) Ethical Labour practice (Ethical Code of Conduct).

2) Both ordinary member and extraordinary member (for trader only) shall pass certification program on Dolphin Safe by Earth Island Institute (EII).

3) Ordinary member shall pass certification programs both Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point Critical (HACCP) as certified by Thai government agency or certified body.

4) Ordinary member and extraordinary member shall cooperate in the implementation of Good Labor Practices (GLP) and attend GLP Visit activity by TTIA team at least once a year.

5) Extraordinary member (for trader only) shall submit the Letter of Commitment to comply with the conditions for extraordinary member, by stating that the company shall commit to purchase tuna products from ordinary member only. They have to show any documents to confirm that the orders said are purchased from ordinary member truly and give any evidence documents to TTIA officer for monitoring without delay.

6) Both ordinary member and extraordinary member shall strictly comply with TTIA policies and resolutions as any that exists and will be released later for the benefit of Thai tuna industry.

2.4 Implementation of TTIA’s Activities in cooperation with its members to combat human trafficking

2.4.1 TTIA’s meetings designed to exchange data and updates, as well as to monitor labour situations

TTIA hosts a meeting involving its members once every 2 months in order to collectively deliberate on relevant matters; report details related to labour issues, updates on legislations and regulations, and developments emanating from labour meetings within the public sector, and NGOs; as well as engage them in campaigns designed to redress labour situations that have bearing on its members. Additionally, TTIA also runs campaigns to encourage member participation in its activities in order to promote good labour practices and the establishment of employees’ welfare committees on work premises.

2.4.2 Implementation of TTIA’s GLP Visit Programme

TTIA continuingly put efforts to comply with the Good Labour Practice (GLP) principles, starting from our collaboration with International Labour Organisation (ILO) and Thai Frozen Foods Association (TFFA) in 2013. After the ILO’s project finished in 2015, we continue to conduct TTIA GLP visits to our members on a timely basis starting from 2016. These visits aimed to support our members in complying with ILO-GLP principles to ensure that their workers are entitled to their labour rights and good relationship between employers and workers are promoted. The activity also helps us to follow up results of the practice of GLP application as well as promote knowledge and understanding on GLP to our members.

TTIA GLP Visit

  • Manual for GLP follow up visit: TTIA revised the manual for GLP follow up visit to be used while conducting visits to factory members. The Manual was based on ILO-GLP Good Labour Practices Guidelines for Packaging and Processing Factories in The Shrimp and Seafood Industry of Thailand: GLP/Processing Plants – under collaboration of International Labour Organisation and Department of Labour Protection and Welfare. The Manual specifies steps of GLP Visit as the following:
    • TTIA conducts GLP visits to members at least once per year
    • TTIA use GLP visit Manual to follow up progress using results from previous TTIA GLP visit to compare results.
    • Visit TTIA members’ factories and production lines.
    • Conduct interviews with employers’ representatives as well as workers’

representatives to collect data about life cycle of workers and their management. Data collection is done based on GLP criteria and Thai labour law, as well as the workplace’s welfare committee’s activities.

  • Request additional documents and proof to be used in TTIA’s deliberation
  • Preparing a summary report for individual member and TTIA’s annual comprehensive industry report

In conclusion, activities related to GLP compliance helped raise awareness of TTIA members to comply with good labour practices on a regular basis; gain updated information related to situation and newly enacted regulations related to labour practice; and have opportunity for experience sharing in solving labour issues and improving welfare for workers.

The Project also developed a policy paper and increase communication and training opportunities with migrant workers to enable them to understand their rights and responsibilities at work. In addition, the Project helped TTIA members to develop good labour relations between employers and workers through the establishment of welfare committees in the workplace with participation of migrant workers.


Part 3 The Application of ILO-GLP in Thai tuna industry

TTIA has been an active partner of the Project Combatting Unacceptable Forms of Work in the Thai Fishing and Seafood Industry, or “Ship to Shore Right” which is a joint project of Ministry of Labour and International Labour Organisation with financial supports from European Union. TTIA sits in two taskforces with roles and responsibilities as detailed as follow:

  • Joint Taskforce 1: Legal, Policy and Regulatory Framework and Access to Support

Services of Workers and Victims of Labour Abuses is responsible for reviewing legal provisions, policies and advocacy on ratification of international legal tools including ILO Convention No. 188 on Work in Fishing Convention (C. 188), and the ILO’s Forced Labour Protocol (P. 29) as well as other legal provisions on labour rights. Changes were also made to the Prevention and Suppression of Trafficking in Person Act B.E. 2551 to provide a clear definition of human trafficking. A bill on Prevention of Force Labour B.E. …… was also drafted and proposed. In addition, findings from research on “Effectiveness of MOU channels for Work in Fishing and Seafood Industry in Thailand” were also shared among the joint taskforce. The vessel owners considered the MOU process expensive and difficult to manage.  The process has stumbling blocks on the side of the sending countries. They felt that they haven’t been consulted sufficiently and the government has forced them to make immediate changes without any leeway time to adapt to new regulations. Standards of the law is too high for vessel owners to bear the cost – with high penalties. Recommendations from business operators include that the EU, the USA and the Thai government should take action on importing workers from sending counties. 

  • Joint Taskforce#2: Labour Inspection, Enforcement, and Good Labour Practices, in which

TTIA is presently a member. We also received financial supports from ILO for joint programme to implement GLP principles among our members to ensure that GLP governance is operational, credible, transparent and sustainable.

For the second taskforce, TTIA joined ILO and TFFA in increasing effectiveness of GLP follow up process to ensure its accountability, as well as to communicate about outcomes of the project to general public. The Project started from 1 January 2018 – 20 December 2019. Up to present, progress made by the Project include the following:

Progress of the Project to Increase Effectiveness of ILO-GLP Compliance in 2018

  • Revision of GLP Guideline and evaluation checklist in collaboration with Ministry of labour
  • Recruiting experts to conduct follow up visits to TTIA members’ workplaces, and Project Coordinator, as well as develop an annual report on industry overview
  • Revisit steps to follow-up and implementation to be more effective
  • Advocate for complaint mechanism through Welfare Committee in workplace
  • Conduct training session on GLP for factories with participation of buyers
  • Apply complaint mechanism
  • Conduct evaluation of the GLP project with participation of members
  • Apply GLP with supply chain
  • Conduct meeting with CSOs
  • Produce information materials about the project including VDO clips

In 2018, TTIA conducted GLP Pre-Test Check list by randomly sample 3 of its members to work with Project Advisor and ILO evaluation staff to ensure that they are ready to apply the newly revised GLP Guideline and evaluation checklist with members in 2019.

Photos: (left) GLP Pre-Test Check list in one of the TTIA members in Samut Sakhon Province on 24 August 2018.

(center) GLP Pre-Test Check list in one of the TTIA members in Samut Prakan Province on 28 August 2018.

(right) GLP Pre-Test Check list in one of the TTIA members in Samut Sakhon Province on 19 November 2018.

In conclusion, for the implementation of GLP-ILO Project in 2019, TTIA will take into account recommendations from the ILO to apply in tuna industry and its supply chain. TTIA will also improve the effectiveness of applying GLP by developing the manual, methods and guide questions, as well as effectively using the complaint mechanism and welfare committee in the workplace.

– TTIA participated in the Ship To Shore Right Project’s taskforce meeting on 21 February 2018.

Photo: Ship To Shore Right Project’s joint taskforce meeting on 21 February 2018

– TTIA participated in the launch of Baseline research findings on fishers and seafood workers in Thailand and the Project Steering Committee Meeting on 7 March 2018.

Photo: the launch of Baseline research findings on fishers and seafood workers in Thailand and the Project Steering Committee Meeting on 7 March 2018.

– TTIA participated in the taskforce meeting under the Ship To Shore Right Project to consider the establishment of GLP taskforce responsible for revision and adaptation of GLP Guideline and Evaluation checklist on 17 May 2018.

Photo: Taskforce meeting for revision and adaptation of GLP Guideline and Evaluation checklist on 17 May 2018.

– TTIA participated in the Taskforce#1: Legal, Policy and Regulatory Framework and Access to Support Services of Workers and Victims of Labour Abuses; and on labor inspection and application of GLP under the Ship To Shore Right Project on 17 September 2018.

Photo: The Project Joint Taskforce Meeting on 17 September 2018

– TTIA gave an interview for VDO filming of ILO’s Ship to Shore Rights Project focusing on elimination of force labour in fishing industry on 30 August 2018.

TTIA General Secretary provided key information on the promotion of good labour practice and ethical standards among TTIA members including not using force labour, non-discrimination and equality, as well as encouraging the establishment of welfare committee as a channel for complaint – with participation of migrant workers and promoting members to apply GLP guideline in their workplaces. TTIA also worked with NGOs to organize workshops to increase capacity of welfare committee where NGOs also provided advises to migrant workers.

Photo: Interview with ILO on the elimination of force labour in fishing industry on 30 August 2018

In conclusion, collaboration of TTIA and ILO under the Ship to Shore Rights Project: combatting Unacceptable forms of Work in the Thai Fishing and Seafood Industry helped increase overall capacity of labour practice in tuna industry, increase accountability and effectiveness of GLP application, and improve complaint mechanism through welfare committee in the workplace.

As a result of the Project implementation, Thailand has ratified the LO Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29), and the National Legislative Assembly approved for Thailand to ratift the ILO Work in Fishing Convention, 2007 (No. 188) which are among the Project goals.


Part 4 Promotion of UN principle on business and Human Rights based on the announced National Agenda “Human Rights as a Driving Force of Thailand 4.0 towards Sustainable Development”

Referring to the Cabinet Resolution on 21 November 2018 officially announce the “National Agenda: Human Rights as a Driving Force of Thailand 4.0 towards Sustainable Development”, starting on 26 March and up to 04 April 2018, members of the UN Working Group on business and human rights were in Thailand for its first official visit to “examine efforts to prevent, mitigate and remedy adverse human rights impacts of business operations.” The Working Group was invited by the Thai government.

Key principles of the UNGP Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights included: 1) Protect which is the State’s responsibility 2) Respect – private sector is responsible for compliance with the laws that protect and promote human rights and 3) Remedy – victims can access to remedies through justice system as provided by the government; and that business has a responsibility at company level to have a consultation process for workers.

– UN Working Group on business and human rights undertook its first official visit on 4 April 2018 (by invitation of the Royal Thai Government during 28 Mach to 4 April 2018).

Photo; members of the UN Working Group on business and human rights were in Thailand for its first official visiton 28 March 2018

During this visit, TTIA had an opportunity to present its efforts on human rights protection in collaboration with different stakeholders including ILO, NGOs, GOs and buyers under the principle of listening to problems and jointly improve the situation. in the past 4 – 5 years, TTIA has worked to cover the issues of Human Rights, due diligence and complaint mechanism

On 4 April 2018, the team of UN experts today presented their preliminary observations which addressed efforts made by TTIA as the following:

We welcome the decisive actions taken by the Government introducing registration of all commercial fishing vessels, new systems of point-in and port-out controls and enhanced labour inspections and increased fines for non-compliance with labour laws and fisheries laws. Action was also taken by industry associations, led by the Thai Tuna Industry Association (TTIA) which adopted a code of conduct on ethical labour practice as a requirement for TTIA membership, including a commitment to monitor compliance with those standards of their suppliers. Government agencies and business associations have also opened up avenues for consultations with trade unions and associations of migrant workers.

We note that the risks of forced labour and trafficking are also present in other sectors in Thailand, such as agriculture and construction, which have a high number of migrant workers. We therefore encourage the Government to replicate and scale up measures taken in the fisheries sector to improve oversight of labour conditions in other sectors, and consider requiring businesses in high risk sectors to conduct and report on human rights due diligence as per the UNGPs.

The Statement was made by Mr. Dante Pesce.

(For more information:   http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=22915&LangID=E)

TTIA has been aware of the importance of complying with Human Rights Principles, it implements the UNGP’s principle’s articles 28 to 30 as detailed as follow:

TTIA also collaborated with other stakeholders that in line with the National Agenda “Human Rights as a Driving Force of Thailand 4.0 towards Sustainable Development” including the following events:

– Attending a National Seminar on Business and Human Rights towards Sustainable Development as a tool for driving UNGP principle.

On 1 June 2018, TTIA’s Secretary General was invited to speak in a panel discussion on “Application of Guiding Principle on Business and Human Rights in Business Sector” in a National Seminar on Business and Human Rights towards Sustainable Development as a tool for driving UNGP principle conducted in Dusit Thani Hotel by National Human Right Commission.

Photo: TTIA participated in National Seminar on Business and Human Rights towards Sustainable Development on 1 June 2018 conducted
by National Human Right Commission

– Participated in Workshop for developing the National Action Plan on Business and Human Rights: NAP at Miracle Grand Convention, conducted by Rights and Liberties Protection Department, Ministry of Justice on 6 July 2018 which was participated by government and civil society organisations.

Photo: TTIA participated in the Workshop for developing the National Action Plan on Business and Human Rights: NAP at Miracle Grand Convention,
conducted by Rights and Liberties Protection Department, Ministry of Justice on 6 July 2018

– Participated in meeting with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development – OECD  under the Project Fostering Responsible Business Conduct organized by Ministry of Foreign Affairs

On 20 September 2018, OECD – which is an organization under the United Nations, presented the Responsible Business Conduct (RBC) and invited private sector in Thailand to discuss on principles of social responsibilities, compliance of UN human rights principles; environmental preservations, fair treatment to workers, and capacity building of private sector organisations under UNGP.

Photo: meeting with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development – OECD under the Project Fostering Responsible Business Conduct organized
by Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 20 September 2018.

– Participated in the National Seminar on Exploring access to effective remedies under UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in Thailand

On 7th November 2018, TTIA participated in the National Seminar on Exploring access to effective remedies under UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in Thailand at Anantara Riverside, conducted by National Human Rights Commission and UNDP. The seminar aimed to disseminate information on UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights especially access to effective remedies in Thailand. During this Seminar, TTIA General Secretary was invited to speak in the afternoon session on effective non-judicial mechanisms on remedies.

Photo: TTIA participated in the National Seminar on Exploring access to effective remedies under UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in Thailand conducted
by National Human Rights Commission and UNDP on 7th November 2018,

– Participated in UN HUMAN RIGHTS Meeting in Geneva, Switzerland during 26-28 November 2018 which was conducted by United Nations

At the meeting on 27 November 2018, Dr. Chanintr Chalisarapong TTIA President presented “Human rights-based sustainable fisheries: an experience from the Thai Tuna Industry” in the seventh annual Forum on Business and Human Rights, by invitation of Ministry of Foreign Affairs. On this platform, TTIA had an opportunity to present how the UNGP principle was applied in the Thai tun industry.

Photo: UN HUMAN RIGHTS Meeting in Geneva, Switzerland during 26-28 November 2018


Part 5 Collaboration with government, IGOs, and NGOs working on labour issues

5.1 Collaboration with government on anti-human trafficking

In working to address human trafficking, TTIA has collaborated with governmental agencies directly and through Thailand’s Chamber of Commerce, the Federation of Thai Industries, Thai Fisheries Producers Coalition, as well as eight Ministries, namely, Ministry of Labour, Ministry Agriculture and Cooperation, Ministry of Commerce, Ministry of Public Health Ministry of Social Development and Human Security, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Interior, and Ministry of Justice. Collaboration has been in the form of meetings and consultations on issues related to labour including the following events:

– TTIA participated in a Thailand National Consultation on strengthening Regional Coordination to Combat Labour Exploitation and Trafficking in Fisheries.

Photo: Thailand National Consultation on strengthening Regional Coordination to Combat Labour Exploitation and Trafficking in Fisheries
on 21 June 2018 organised by Ministry of Labour

– TTIA participated in the 1st Joint Task Force Meeting on Combatting Unacceptable Forms of Work in the Thai Fishing and Seafood Industry on 11 September 2018, organized by Department of Labour Protection and Welfare, Ministry of Labour.

Photo: 1st Joint Task Force Meeting on Combatting Unacceptable Forms of Work in the Thai Fishing and Seafood Industry on 11 September 2018, organized
by Department of Labour Protection and Welfare, Ministry of Labour

– TTIA participated in the 1 /2561 taskforce meeting on the implementation of GLP in fish and seafood processing factories in Thailand on 24 December 2018, conducted by Department of Labour Protection and Welfare.

Photo: 1 /2561 taskforce meeting on the implementation of GLP in fish and seafood processing factories in Thailand on 24 December 2018, conducted
by Department of Labour Protection and Welfare

5.2 Collaboration with International Organisation for Migration (IOM)

In 2018, TTIA established work relation with IOM to encourage its members to apply the principle for fair recruitment of migrant workers based on international standard in their workplaces. Collaboration and consultations include the following:

– TTIA had a consultation meeting with IOM to agree upon approaches for conducting training for members on fair recruiting migrant workers on 7 September 2018.

Photo: a consultation meeting with IOM to agree upon approaches for conducting training for members on fair recruiting migrant workers on 7 September 2018.

TTIA in collaboration with IOM conducted a training workshop for members on fair recruiting migrant workers on 14 December 2018 at the TTIA Office.

Photo: The training workshop on fair recruiting migrant workers on 14 December 2018

In summary, the training workshop on fair recruitment of migrant workers presented viewpoints of international principles on responsibility over costs of importing migrant workers into Thailand, and significance of costs occurred in the country of origin. After the training on fair recruitment of migrant workers, IOM presented a project to evaluate companies on fair recruitment of migrant workers – with the aim to promote transparency in export industries and support employers in compliance with the principle of employer’s responsibility over recruitment costs (International Recruitment Integrity System: IRIS). Interested members can join this project in 2019.

– TTIA participated in South East Asia Meeting on Eliminating Human Trafficking and Force Labour among fishing workers in Bali, Indonesia during 26-29 November 2018, organized by ILO Jakarta.

TTIA Secretary General was invited to speak about changes and improvement over the past five years in the area of anti- human trafficking. TTIA presented the association’s practices to ensure that its products are free from human trafficking and force labour. TTIA members import frozen whole tunas up to 95% and export 98% of its products. TTIA members imported frozen whole tuna from large fishing boats which human trafficking problem is not found.

In the past 5 years, TTIA has set up 8 Ethical Standards on labour practices for members to comply with. Among these standards include no use of child labour and force labour, and the promotion of compliance of good labour practices in the workplaces and their supply chain under collaboration if ILO and NGOs.

In addition, TTIA members were supported to establish a welfare committee in the workplace with participation of migrant workers, and use this body to receive complaints from workers, as well as to comply with the rights to organisations and association.

Photo: South East Asia Meeting on Eliminating Human Trafficking and Force Labour among fishing workers in Bali, Indonesia during 26-29 November 2018

5.3 Collaboration with NGOs

TTIA has worked with NGOs – which helped the tuna industry improve ethical conduct towards workers including taking complaints into consideration for improving; consultations to share experiences with Migrant Worker Rights Network (MWRN); PLAN International Thailand; and Migrant Working Group (MWG). Collaboration with NGOs in 2018 are detailed as follow:

5.3.1 The Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI) Training with financial support from KESKO

Since August 2016, TTIA has worked with Plan International Thailand and jointly conducted training project on The Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI) Training with a 2 million Baht financial support from KESKO from Finland. Aims of the project is to promote supply chain engagement in this issue. 4 training sessions were conducted for TTIA members in 2017, and one training in 2018 to prepare for evaluation visits by factory. TTIA had a meeting to conclude the project with Kesco in March 2018.

Photo: 5th BSCI training with supports from KESKO on 14-16 February 2018

5.3.2 Participation in the meeting of Taskforce on Policy Advocacy on the Rights of Migrant Children on 18 March 2018 organised by PLAN International Thailand

In 2018, TTIA participated in the meeting of Taskforce on Policy Advocacy on the Rights of Migrant Children on 18 March 2018 organised by PLAN International Thailand. The meeting was also attended by other IGOs and NGOs including ILO, LPN, Friend international, Rapid Asia, and MWG. The meeting brainstormed ideas on developing collaboration mechanism among stakeholders to promote access to the right to education of migrant children under “Change for Migrant Child and Youth Coalition” (CMCY)

Photo: A Workshop for a taskforce on Policy Advocacy on the Rights of Migrant Children on 18 March 2018

5.3.3 Consultative Meeting with MWRN to plan for joint event

In January 2018, TTIA in collaboration of Migrant Worker Rights Network (MWRN) conducted a social dialogue to increase effectiveness of Workplace’s welfare committee with participation of migrant workers titled “Promoting Welfare Committee to be Accepted by Migrant Workers”

This Social Dialogue’s topic was derived from results of TTIA GLP Visit during 2017. Data collection from interviewed worker representatives reflected that roles & responsibilities of workplace’s welfare committee is the topic that they understood the least. This event, therefore, aims at promoting understanding about workplace’s welfare committee’s functions among migrant workers to ensure effectiveness in receiving complaints and recommendations from all workers including migrant. The 4th Social Dialogue is planned in January 2018.

               Photo: Consultation meeting to prepare for the 4th Social Dialogue                                       Photo: the 4th Social Dialogue Promoting Welfare Committee to be Accepted by Migrant Worker on 19 January 2018

5.3.4 Promoting of complaint mechanism in collaboration of CSOs by supporting the establishment of the Fisherman Center by Labour Rights Protection Network (LPN)

TTIA supported the establishment of the Fisherman Center, operated by the Labour Rights Protection Network (LPN). The Fisherman Center is a center for monitoring and prevention of human trafficking in fishing industry. The Center receives complaints from workers in all sectors, conduct visit to workers, fact finding, case recording, and get signature from the worker, before referral the case to relevant governmental agencies, as well as following up the case from the beginning to the end.

In the near future, this Project will be expanded to cover 22 coastal provinces and locations where PIPO Centers were located.

Photo: TTIA staff members visited the Fisherman Center on 22 January 2018.